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Issue 6.2

FEATURE

Crystal-Clear Code

Issue: 6.2 (January/February 2008)
Author: Jens Bendig and Christian Fröbel
Author Bio: Jens Bendig founded a computer animation company, motionDesign, in 1996 and a small IT business called Void in 1998. In his youth he was fascinated by two things, film and software, and he still is. If you want to contact him, just Google his name! Christian Fröbel is a software developer at MeVis BreastCare in Bremen, Germany. The only thing he's done longer than programming is Judo, though recently he's become accustomed to Japanese food.
Article Description: No description available.
Article Length (in bytes): 38,307
Starting Page Number: 14
Article Number: 6209
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Download Icon 6209.zip Updated: 2008-01-15 16:47:27

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Excerpt of article text...

Abstract

Today's interfaces support ambiguity. The reason lies in a poor understanding of the roles programmers and users have, combined with a poor understanding of the perspectives code should be looked at while taking those roles into account. This poor understanding surrounds a big black hole: the understanding of what we call a bug.

In the first half of this article, I will try to sharpen the terms: user, using-code, using-code programmer, donating-code, donating-code programmer. I'll try to show that we unfortunately have two separate channels mixed up in our applications: the information channel and the bug channel.

In the second half, I'll show a technical solution to get those channels strictly separated and gain much clearer interfaces. This will lead to code that's a lot easier to read: crystal-clear code.

Preface: Good Interfaces Make Good Using-Code

What is the secret of crystal-clear code? What makes it so easy to read?

...End of Excerpt. Please purchase the magazine to read the full article.